The Live Jazz List For the Week of 7/16/2014

Christmas jazz evening

The Live Jazz List

For the Week of 7/16/2014

By

Jim & Jeanine

 

Brought to you Courtesy of the

Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

 

July 16

WEDNESDAY

 

Olivia Duhon and the Frank Brown Duo – Main Street Tavern, Broken Arrow, 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.

 

Amanda Preslar with Shelby Eicher and Mark Bruner – Full Moon on Cherry Street, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

 

7 Blue – Hey Mambo, 114 N Boston, 7:30 to 10:00 p.m.

 

Mike Cameron CollectiveFeaturing Scott McQuade on keys, Dean DeMerritt on bass, Jared Johnson on drums and Mike Cameron on sax – Cellar Dweller, 417 W. 7th, 9:30 to 11:30 p.m.

 

July 17

THURSDAY

 

JazzwichBrown Bag or Food Truck Lunch and Jazz with Tim Shadley, Jordan Hehl and Nicholas Foster – Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, 111 East First Street, Upper Level, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., FREE!

 

Rebecca Ungerman – Atlas Sings, Atlas Grill, 415 S Boston, 11:30 a.m.

 

Third Thursday Jazz Night – Zarrow Center, 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.  No charge for admission.

 

Angie Cockrell and Mike Leland – Bluestone Steakhouse and Seafood Restaurant, 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.

 

Hefner Grill Trio with Nathan Eicher – Hefner Grill, Oklahoma City,6:30 to 9:30 p.m.

Jordan Hehl Duo: featuring Jordan Hehl on bass – The Vault, 620 SCincinnati, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

 

Duo Sonics –Tallgrass Prairie Table, 313 E. 2nd, 8:00 to 11:00 p.m.

 

July 18

FRIDAY

 

JazzwichBrown Bag or Food Truck Lunch and Jazz with Tim Shadley, Jordan Hehl and Nicholas Foster – Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, 111 East First Street, Upper Level, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., No Cover!

 

Hefner Grill Trio with Nathan Eicher – Hefner Grill, Oklahoma City,6:30 to 9:30 p.m.

Diffident Rebel Benefit Concert: The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame welcomes Paul Rossler and Diffident Rebel in a benefit concert featuring their very own original Okie-grown Americana music. The band will debut a number of new songs as well as a few new, stripped-down versions of songs from their debut album, Red Dirt Reggae. Special guest singer-songwriter Grant Ragsdale will open.  Band proceeds from ticket and merchandise sales will go to the Ami Whitlow-Brown Fund. Ami Whitlow-Brown is a wife, mother of three, and Jenks special education teacher who was diagnosed with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia on June 19, 2014. She is currently at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston,Texas receiving treatment. For more details on the Fund, please visitPraying for Ami Whitlow-Brown on Facebook and its companiondonation site. Show starts at 7:00, with local food trucks on site before the show. Tickets are $10 at the door or in advance atwww.eventbrite.com.

 

Mike Cameron Collective: Featuring Stephanie Oliver on vocals, Frank Brown on guitar and Jim Bates on bass – Daily Grill, Hyatt Regency Hotel,7:00 to 10:00 p.m.

 

7 Blue – Hey Mambo, 114 N Boston, 7:00 to 9:30 p.m.

 

Dean DeMerritt Jazz Tribe: Featuring Sarah Maud on vocals, Scott McQuade on keys, Mike Cameron on sax, Michael Bremo on drums and Dean on bass – Pepper’s Grill 91st & Delaware, 8:30 to 11:30 p.m.

 

Reggae and Jazz Jam – Hibiscus Caribbean Grill, 3316 S Peoria, 10:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.  $5 cover includes entry and one beer.

 

July 19

SATURDAY

 

Hefner Grill Trio with Nathan Eicher – Hefner Grill, Oklahoma City,6:30 to 9:30 p.m.

 

Pete and Jennifer Marriott Blues Band – Pepper’s Grill 91st &Delaware, 8:30 to 11:30 p.m.

 

July 20

SUNDAY

 

Myron Oliver – Jazz Brunch at Infuzion Ultra Lounge and Bistro, 101st and Mingo, 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

 

Mark Bruner – Sunday Brunch, Polo Grill, Utica Square, 11:30 to 1:30 p.m.

 

Youth Showcase –  Pepper’s Grill 91st & Delaware, 2:00 p.m.

 

Cindy Cain: Summertime Blues: The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Famewelcomes vocalist Cindy Cain to the Jazz Depot stage in her unforgettable show: Summertime Blues. Jazz Hall favorite Cindy Cain is joined in concert by bassist Dean DeMerritt, Scott McQuade on piano, Charles Tuperville on guitar, and drummer Wade Robertson. –Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, 111 E First, Upper Level.  Sunday,5:00 to 7:00 p.m. Purchase your tickets at the door or call Bettie Downing at (918) 281-8609.   Members and Seniors enjoy discounted ticket prices at $10.00 each.  General Admission tickets are only $15.00 or $20.00 for Reserved Table Seating. High school and middle school students admitted for only $5.00.  This event is a part of the Jazz Hall’s Summer Concert Series.  Free parking.

 

Mark Bruner and Tommy Crook – Full Moon Café on Cherry Street,6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

 

Stephanie Oliver and the Frank Brown Duo – Bodean’s, 51st and Harvard, 7:00 to 10:00 p.m.

 

 

July 21

MONDAY

 

Rebecca Ungerman with Jordan Hehl – Musical Mondays at Whole Foods, 41st and Peoria, Monday, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

 

Sandy and Chuck Gardner – Musical Mondays, Cascia Hall PerformingArts Center, 2600 S. Utica, 7:00 p.m.

 

Cypher 120 with Written Quincey – Creative Room, 1317 E 6th, 8:00 p.m. to midnight.

 

Mike Cameron Collective: Scott McQuade on keys, George Toumayan on drums and Mike Cameron on sax – Hodge’s Bend, 815 E 3rd, 9:00 to 11:30 p.m.

 

 

 

July 22

TUESDAY

 

Jazz Depot Jazz Jam Session: Featuring Mike Leland – Oklahoma JazzHall of Fame, 111 E First, Upper Level, 5:30 to 8:00 p.m.   Come play, come sing or come listen – FREE

 

Jazz Depot Blues Jam SessionFeaturing Jack Wolfe – Oklahoma JazzHall of Fame, 111 E First, Upper Level, 8:00 to 10:00 p.m.   Come play, come sing or come listen – FREE

 

Rebecca Ungerman – The Tulsa Sound Sampler at Whole Foods, 41st andPeoria, 6:00 p.m.

 

Mark Bruner – Ridge Grill, 9999 S. Mingo, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

 

Kings of Musica 7 piece band that plays every Tuesday for ballroom dancing – Moose Lodge, 11106 E. 7th Street, 7:30 to 9:45 p.m.

 

Dean DeMerritt and the Frank Brown Jazz Duo – Centennial Lounge, VFW, 1109 E. 6th, 9:00 p.m. to midnight

 

 

Please support clubs and restaurants that hire jazz musicians!

 

Jim and Jeanine

 

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame is a 501© (3), non-profit, cultural and educational organization. It exists to provide a system in and for the State ofOklahoma to preserve, promote and illuminate the true art forms of jazz, blues and gospel music; also identify, document and honor the artists who have made a significant contribution locally, regionally, nationally and internationally to its development. Additionally, the Oklahoma Jazz Hall ofFame promotes learning, training, classes, performances and cultural events with and on behalf of disadvantaged youth of all races, creeds, religions and ethnic heritage and provides scholarships to graduating students. We celebrate the music of America.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

 

 

 

Steve Ham and The Jambalaya Jass Band Perform at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

steve ham 1

 Long-Lived Jambalaya Jass Band Begins Jazz Depot’s Winter Concert Series

            If you’ve ever wondered why trombonist Steve “Hambone” Ham and trumpeter Mike Bennett play so uncannily well together, it’s because they’ve had plenty of practice. As Ham recalls it, the two played their first job as a duo back in 1976 – on a stage light-years away from the listening-room atmosphere of the Jazz Depot, where they’re performing with Ham’s Jambalaya Jass Band on Sunday.

            “It was over at the Golden Hurricane Lounge, that old strip joint,” Ham says with a chuckle. “I was 19 and he was 18; I was playing sousaphone and he was playing trumpet. We’d go in there and play blues and some old Dixieland tunes, New Orleans tunes. I think they paid us ten dollars a night and all the beer we could drink. The first weekend we were there, somebody got stabbed. The second weekend, there was a gunshot. And we left and never went back.”

They may have left that gig for good, but, individually and together, they never left the music. Students in the University of Tulsa’s music program at the time, they both went on to carve out careers as two of Tulsa’s top instrumentalists, positions they still hold today.

Among his other musical jobs, Bennett has been the trumpeter for Ham’s group from the beginning, which came about not all that long after the duo’s debut at the Golden Hurricane Lounge.

As Ham remembers it, he was playing in a Dixieland band run by “a businessman who just cracked whips on guys.” After a blowup over a job that Ham had helped book for the group, the leader suggested that it might be better if Ham went off and formed his own band.

“I said, `That ain’t no problem,’ and that’s when we named the band,” he says. “It was sometime in the early ’80s.”Steve Ham's Jambalaya Jazz Band

Ham’s Jambalaya Jass Band has been entertaining audiences ever since, with a lineup that fluctuates somewhat but usually includes, in addition to Ham and Bennett, the veterans Bill Crosby on bass and Tony Yohe on drums, both of whom are set to be a part of things on Sunday. Ham’s son Heath Ham, heard most recently on the Diffident Rebel CD Red Dirt Reggae, plays guitar.

It may be because he chafed under the leadership of a “whip-cracker” all those years ago, but Ham has made sure from the beginning to allow the musicians in his group plenty of freedom. In fact, he pretty much insists on it.

“In most gigs, there’s a box you’ve got to kind of stay in,” he explains. “In myband, I could care less. Just play whatever you want to play. I mean, I don’t want to play stuff that’s above an audience’s head. I don’t want to sound like Coltrane. But we just never know what we’re going to do when we play. I may change tunes right in the middle of a song, and I’ll expect my guys to go with me. Or they may change the tune. We just

never know.”

He doesn’t even quite know how to label the music performed by the group, which many would describe as Dixieland jazz.steve ham 2

“I guess I call mine more New Orleans stuff,” he says. “I don’t really know what Dixieland is. I like [Louis] Armstrong, and I like the Olympia Brass Band, those brass bands down in New Orleans. We’ve got some of that happening.”

Still, he adds, there’s at least one classic Dixieland tune that the Jambalaya Jass Band ends up doing at just about every appearance.

“We usually play `When the Saints Go Marching In,'” he says. “I get asked a lot to do `Rosetta,’ too. I’ll have a list of tunes in front of me, just in case I can’t remember the names of some of ’em. But sometimes, I’ll just start playing, and the band’ll follow me. Or Bennett’ll go, `You’re putting them to sleep. Let’s play this.'”

Ham laughs. “What that means is, `Let’s play something that features me, `Bone. Let’s play something I can show off on.’

“And why not?” Ham adds with another laugh. “He’s a hell of a trumpet player.”

Steve Ham’s Jambalaya Jass Band is set to begin at 5:00 p.m. on Sunday, December 1, at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Depot, 111 E. First Street. Tickets can be purchased at the depot, fromwww.myticketoffice.com, or by calling Bettie Downing at 918-281-8609. General admission is $15, reserved table seating $20. Seniors and Jazz Hall members are admitted for $10, and high school and junior high students for $5.

The show is the first in the Jazz Hall’s 2013-14 Winter Concert Series.

 

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fameis a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomans through preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

jazz hall at night

 

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Donald Ryan Performs at The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame.

Donald Ryan web sm

Pianist Donald Ryan Celebrates ’60s at Jazz Depot Sunday

 

            For many, the jazz music of Henry Mancini conjures up memories of the old Peter Gunn television show, a classic private-eye series that featured cool Mancini compositions in practically every episode.  One of those was the exquisite “Dreamsville,” which will always be associated with Peter Gunn and Lola Albright, the show’s singing star.

Although the noted pianist Donald Ryan loves “Dreamsville” and plans to play it at his Sunday Jazz Depot concert, Celebrating the ’60s, he wasn’t introduced to the song via Peter Gunn. In fact, he’s not even sure if the series played in his home country, the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, an island nation off the northern edge of South America. As he recalls, he first heard “Dreamsville” well after he’d moved to America to pursue his music, settling in the Tulsa area and receiving degrees from Oral Roberts University and the University of Tulsa.

“It’s really a tribute to a mentor of mine, [bandleader-saxophonist] Richard Cox,” he explains. “It was through Richard that I got to know `Dreamsville,’ because it was runway music for the Miss Oklahoma Pageant. He was music director of the Miss Oklahoma Pageant for a few years, and he had me play in the orchestra.

“The first time I played `Dreamsville,’ I just about came out of my seat. It was everything good about music.”

Although he hadn’t become acquainted with that particular number while in Trinidad, Ryan had grown up listening to songs by the likes of Mancini and Burt Bacharach, although they weren’t always easy to find on the airwaves.

“There was an Armed Forces Radio station that I used to listen to a lot, but we did not have many stations, and the programming was kind of all-inclusive – a soap opera or two, some government stuff, kind of like C-Span on radio,” he recalls. “There weren’t any stations that played music all day every day. You had to catch certain shows, an hour here, two hours there. But I soaked up as much as I could.”

nancy wilson 1        From the beginning, he adds, “I was drawn as much to the compositional side of things as I was to the performers, singers and such. I was always interested in what was happening in the background – if it was a singer, what made the singer so good. One of the singers I couldn’t get enough of was Nancy Wilson, and she always had terrific arrangements. That was what, as they would say here, floated my boat about music. I liked what was going on inside.”

“Donald Ryan is known for his versatility, a true master of ragtime and classical piano,” said Jason McIntosh, Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame CEO. “But his love of music is what makes working with him so enjoyable.

“Sunday’s concert will be the first time he performs Celebrating the ’60s, and the audience can expect an innovative performance and memorable night.”

Sunday, Ryan plans to get inside a number of 1960s-related songs – with perhaps a couple of newer tunes as well – both as a solo pianist and with a rhythm section consisting of Tracy Kouns on bass and George Toumayan on drums. He’ll draw most of the evening’s show, he says, from four sources.

“Mancini was kind of a musical hero of mine, so I thought I’d play some of his stuff. `Days of Wine and Roses’ is a popular thing, and I probably will do that. I used to love and still do love `Dear Heart,’ and other things like `Dreamsville.’henry-mancini-05

“So Mancini I wanted to do some of, and Bacharach, yes. Some of the better-known things like `Look of Love.’ `Alfie’ was a big hit in Trinidad. I had not thought of it in years and came across it and thought, `Oh, that’s too beautiful to leave out.'”

Ryan’s other two sources include Antonio Carlos Jobim – “I always like to do my Brazilian things,” he notes – and the act that defined ’60s pop music. Sunday’s audience members can expect to hear Ryan’s versions of the Beatles’ “Eleanor Rigby,” “Lady Madonna,” and the one he says he thinks “tops the list of what they did,” the ethereally beautiful “Here, There, and Everywhere.”

“I’ve done a lot of ’50s-’40s stuff,” he says. “And I thought, `The ’60s were such an exciting time for me, as I was growing up, musically, that [this time] I wanted to do a lot of it.'”

Ryan’s Celebrating the `60s show is set to begin at 5:00 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 24, at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Depot, 111 E. First Street. Tickets can be purchased at the depot, from www.myticketoffice.com, or by calling Bettie Downing at 918-281-8609. General admission is $15, reserved table seating $20. Seniors and Jazz Hall members are admitted for $10, and high school and junior high students for $5.

The show is a part of the Jazz Hall’s 2013 Autumn Concert Series.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fameis a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomans through preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

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The Maud Squad at The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

sarah maud lg

SARAH MAUD’S MAUD SQUAD DEBUTS AS JAZZ DEPOT HEADLINER

 

           There’s no shortage of jazz trios, and good ones, on the Tulsa music landscape. The Maud Squad, however, may be the most unusual one of the bunch.

It’s not that area fans don’t know the personnel: drummer Nicholas Foster and bassist Jordan Hehl are mainstays of the scene, very familiar to Jazz Depot patrons, and so is vocalist Sarah Maud.

The difference is in the configuration: drums, bass, and vocals. That’s it. And that’s what you’re going to hear Sunday, when Sarah Maud and the Maud Squad perform their first-ever show as Jazz Depot headliners.

As a singer working only with bass and drums, Maud says, “It takes a lot of listening. When you’re a vocalist, you sometimes find yourself having a kind of crutch, and for a lot of vocalists, it’s a chord. If you forget a melody line or something, and you hear the chord, then you’re going to find someplace to go. But here, you don’t have a chord to fall back on. In a lot of it, I end up being the chordal instrument with my voice.sarah maud 2

“But,” she adds, “it’s a really cool sound if you can pull it off.”

Once, the group had a more traditional makeup, with Steven Schrag – who recently left Tulsa to do postgraduate work at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania — playing piano. As Maud points out, however, he came along after she, Hehl, and Foster had already started experimenting with their bass-drums-vocal sound.

“Steven Schrag wasn’t there when we started; he was off in Spain, studying abroad,” she recalls. “So it was just Nicholas and Jordan and me. Then Steven ended up coming back, and everything came together. So it was funny when he left, because it was like, `Ohhh, what are we going to do?'” She laughs. “Then, we realized that we’d started without him in the first place.”

Although she’s not sure how many, if any, will be deployed at Sunday’s Jazz Depot concert, Maud points out that other instruments are occasionally used in the Maud Squad’s performances.

“There might be a time when Nicholas’ll play the guitar,” she notes. “There might be a time when Jordan plays cello. There might be a time when I play the ukulele or banjolele, I don’t know if we’ll do any of that on Sunday or not.”

What they will do, she adds, is present a show that ranges from jazz standards to pop, rock, and even alternative tunes. Two of the songs on Sunday’s playlist give an idea of the range of genres people can expect.

“One day we were jamming and having fun with the [bossa nova] song `Wave,’ and it turned into something that we thought was really, really cool. We kept the integrity of the song, but we turned it into something that we really liked. So we’ll do that one Sunday. Another song we’ve been doing a lot at gigs is `I Want You Back’ by the Jackson Five. We’re going to try and do a bunch of different styles, except making it all us, if that makes sense.”

To Maud, the stage of the Jazz Depot “feels like home,” and there’s a good reason for that. While still in high school, she visited the Tuesday night Depot Jams. Then, after beginning studies at the University of Tulsa a couple of years ago, she found herself regularly accompanying classmates Hehl and Foster to the weekly sessions.

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“That’s how I got to know people at the Jazz Hall,” she explains. “I basically ended up being a house singer. Whenever the guys needed me I’d pop up there. After that, Jason [McIntosh, Jazz Hall CEO] would sometimes have me sing at private parties. Then, slowly, it started segueing into people asking me, `Hey, you want to sing a song on my show Sunday night?’ That’s how it all started.

“I’m kind of nervous about the show,” she adds, “because I’m hoping that the crowd there will enjoy it. We’re doing more jazz standards than what we usually do; I tried to put songs in there that the older crowd will enjoy, while we change them to the way we like them. I hope they’ll still like them. It’s real hard to please everybody, and I know that’s not going to happen, but I am just a little nervous.”

The Maud Squad is set to begin at 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 29, at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Depot, 111 E. First Street. Tickets can be purchased at the depot, from www.myticketoffice.com, or by calling Bettie Downing at 918-281-8609. General admission is $15, reserved table seating $20. Seniors and Jazz Hall members are admitted for $10, and high school and junior high students for $5.

The show is a part of the Jazz Hall’s 2013 Autumn Concert Series.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomans through preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

 

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The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame presents “Salute to Father’s Day: Thanks, Dad!”

Fathers Day love you

 “Salute to Father’s Day: Thanks, Dad!”

Fathers and Sons in Concert

Quite a while ago-Mike Moore isn’t sure exactly when-plans were floated for a band composed entirely of father and son musicians to play a show for the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame. That idea sounded great to Moore and his son David, both of whom are highly regarded trumpeters. 

“We heard about it, and we were excited about it,” Mike recalls. Given the logical opportunity of Father’s Day this year, Mike and David thought it would be good to resurrect the family-band notion, and front a Jazz Depot show.

Despite the fact that they both play the trumpet, David and Mike have found other opportunities to perform together. They held down a regular gig at a Tulsa restaurant, for instance, until the owner decided to stop featuring live music. They occasionally perform together in bandleader Leon Rollerson’s groups. And Sundays find them at St. Pius X Catholic Church with organist Michele Cowen, who goes back with Mike to the University of Tulsa.

“We play during the Mass and we play special music,” Mike says. “Michele Cowen was formerly on the University of Tulsa faculty, and choir director Karen Gingrich is a TU graduate. There’s a connection among us all. For instance, Michele was the accompanist on David’s classical recitals when he was at TU.”

David is now pursuing a master’s degree in jazz studies at the University of Northern Colorado, where he also plays locally with the Mark Sloniker Quartet. He just recorded a disc with Jeff Coffin, the saxophonist for the Dave Matthews Band, and Ryan Middagh, another sax man who’s an alumnus of the Harry Connick Jr. Big Band.

“It hasn’t been released yet, but it’s called Colorado Brews,” notes David. “Every tune on it is named after a different beer from Colorado.”

Since David is only home in the summer, the opportunities to share a stage with his dad are limited – especially since David has also been working on and off around town with the likes of the Paul Benjamin Band, Mike Cameron, Ryan “Chips” Tedder, and Jordan Hehl. The latter is a member of the trio scheduled to play with Mike and David on the Father’s Day concert.

“David wanted to hire our rhythm section, and I remember Miles Davis committing himself to print several times, saying, `Playing with younger players keeps you young, keeps you fresh,'” says Mike. “So he’s hired a rhythm section of younger players, goodplayers, He’s got George Toumayan on drums, Jordan Hehl on bass, and Steven Schrag on piano.”

According to David, the quintet plans to present a selection of jazz numbers old and new, chosen by him and his father.

“We sat down together and threw tunes back and forth until we came up with a list,” he explains. “We’re going to do some more modern jazz, we’re going to do some older jazz, and we decided we wanted to pick a couple of tunes from albums that were recorded with two trumpets on the front line. So we’ll do `Moontrane,’ which was recorded by Woody Shaw several times, but once on an album with Freddie Hubbard where they played it together. And we’ll also do “Little Dancer.” It’s a Tom Harrell tune, and he recorded it on an album with John McNeil.

As for standards, he adds, “We’ve got `Honeysuckle Rose’ and `There Will Never be Another You,’ and then my dad is going to be featured on `My Funny Valentine’ and I’m going to be featured on `Skylark.’

“I’ve only met a handful of people who’ve gotten to do this kind of thing with other family members,’ David concludes. “It’s a great feeling to get up there and play this stuff with your dad.”

Mike and David Moore’s Father’s Day show is set to begin at 5:00p.m. Sunday, June 16, at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Depot, 111 E. First St. Tickets can be purchased at the Jazz Depot or by calling Bettie Downing at918-281-8609. General admission is $15, reserved table seating $20. Seniors and Jazz Hall members are admitted for $10, and high school and junior high students for $5. Refreshments will be available for purchase.

The event is a part of the Jazz Hall’s Summer Concert Series.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomans through preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

 

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TU Jazz Combo This Sunday At The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

TU Jazz Combo This Sunday At The Jazz Hall 

Show Produced By George Toumayan & Steven Schrag  

To Feature Standards & Originals 

            

Drummer and percussionist George Toumayan is no stranger to the Jazz Depot stage, playing

there, with, among others, the internationally known jazz guitarist from Tulsa, Pat Kelley. In addition to backing Kelley in two separate concerts, Toumay

an also played percussion behind the legendary Aretha Franklin, when the Queen of Soul appeared at the Council Road Casino in Newkirk a year ago.

“I still like to talk about that one,” he says with a chuckle.

Sunday, however, Toumayan is only going to make what amounts to a cameo appearance, taking the stage just to turn it over to the seven-man University of Tulsa Jazz Combo.

“Steven Schrag and I will introduce them, and a get out of their way,” he says. “They’re great cats, and they’ll run the show after that. They know their tempos. They know when to stop. They have it down. We program the music, and they go.”

Several of the band members are also no strangers to the Jazz Depot spotlight, having performed with the TU ensemble there as a part of the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame’s 2012 Spring Concert Series.

“Our piano player, bass player, and guitar player are new,” Toumayan points out. “The rest played at the Jazz Hall in April. And our drummer, Nicholas Foster, has played there quite a bit.”

In addition to Foster, the TU Jazz Combo lineup includes T.J. Smith on trombone, Bobby Kitchen on alto saxophone, Brian Gault on tenor sax, Benjamin Krumwiede on piano, Paul Humphrey on guitar, and Craig DeLammermore on bass.

“We’ve got a nice, full, rhythm section, in addition to the trombone and saxophones,” notes fellow producer Steven Schrag

All seven of the combo members are students at the University of Tulsa, where Toumayan and Schrag teach in the jazz studies program.

Toumayan teaches jazz drum set in the jazz studies program  “What `jazz drum set’ means is that I teach students at the university on an actual drum setup, like you’d have in a band,” he explains. “If they sit down at the drum set, then they’re my kids.”

Although Toumayan put in a few years in at that position, his tutelage of the TU Jazz Combo is much more recent. The current semester is only Toumayan’s second as Jazz Combo instructor.

“Basically, what happed was that the position became available, and I was  asked if I’d be interested in it,” says Toumayan. “I said, `Sure. Yes. I’d love to teach.’ And I have to say that it’s been a real joy working with this lineup. They’ve made it easy for me in a lot of ways.”

On Sunday, he adds, “They’re going to do a nice set, about 45 minutes, then an intermission and another 30 or 40 minutes. The students have five originals, which we’re going to mix in with standard jazz charts for tunes like [Wayne Shorter’s] `Footprints,’ [Oliver Nelson’s] `Stolen Moments,’ and [Thelonious Monk’s] `Straight, No Chaser.’ Mostly, the program will consist of a standard, followed by an original composition, followed by a standard, followed by an original composition. So it’ll all be mixed together.”

As both jazz instructor and musician, Toumayan is in a position to evaluate the current state of Tulsa-area jazz music, and he is positive about what he sees at The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, TU and across the state.

“One of the great things is the Depot Jams every Tuesday night at the Jazz Hall. Lots of cats go there and play and develop their music. The Jazz Hall is a good place to do that.

“We definitely have our share of wonderful players here,” he adds. “It’s a good place for a jazz musician to be.”

The University of Tulsa Jazz Combo is set to begin Sunday, Nov. 11 at 5 p.m. at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Depot, 111 E. First St. Tickets can be purchased at the Depot or by calling Bettie Downing at 918-281-8609. General admission is $15, reserved table seating $20. Seniors and Jazz Hall members are admitted for $10, and high school and junior high students for $5. Refreshments will be available for purchase.

The show is a part of the Jazz Hall’s 2012 Autumn Concert Series.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomans through preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

                                       

 

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