TulsaJazz.Com Presents Angie Cockrell and Mike Leland at Bluestone Steakhouse

 

 

IMG_35927277830519Angie Cockrell is one of the most versatile singers in the Tulsa area. Country, Folk, Blues, Christian, Jazz, you name it, not only can she sing it all, but she sings it well!

This is evident by her “Absolute Best of Tulsa” award from Urban Tulsa Weekly, in the Christian music category in 2013. Wednesday and Thursday nights, this award winning singer brings her smooth, silky, voice to Bluestone Steakhouse for an incredible night of jazz. Accompanied by the renown and incredibly talented keyboardist Mike Leland this duo will treat your ears to some jazz deliciousness as they serve up many up your favorites and some tantalizing new tunes.wpid-20150128_203502.jpg

Come have dinner and enjoy an evening of wonderful music, Angie and Mike’s performance starts at 6 pm, reservations are recommended but not required.

This show is a Tulsa Jazz.Com Production.

Date/Time: 

Wednesday April 29th, 2015 6 pm-9 pm

Thursday April 30th, 2015 6 pm-9 pm

Angie’s Website: http://www.angiecockrell.com/

Bluestone Steakhouse Website: http://www.bluestonesteakhouse.com/

Location: 10032 S Sheridan Rd, Tulsa, OK 74133

Phone: 918-296-9889

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TulsaJazz.Com Presents Angie Cockrell and Mike Leland at Bluestone Steakhouse

 

Angie Cockrell

Angie Cockrell

Angie Cockrell is one of the most versatile singers in the Tulsa area. Country, Folk, Blues, Christian, Jazz, you name it, not only can she sing it all, but she sings it well!

This is evident by her “Absolute Best of Tulsa” award from Urban Tulsa Weekly, in the Christian music category in 2013. Wednesday and Thursday night, this award winning singer brings her smooth, silky, voice to Bluestone Steakhouse for two incredible nights of jazz. Accompanied by the renown and incredibly talented keyboardist Mike Leland this duo will treat your ears to some jazz deliciousness as they serve up many up your favorites and some tantalizing new tunes.

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Come have dinner and enjoy an evening of wonderful music, Angie and Mike’s performance starts at 6 pm, reservations are recommended but not required.

This show is a Tulsa Jazz.Com Production.

Date/Time: Wednesday and Thursday April 15th-16th, 2015 6 pm-9 pm

Angie’s Website: http://www.angiecockrell.com/

Bluestone Steakhouse Website: http://www.bluestonesteakhouse.com/

Location: 10032 S Sheridan Rd, Tulsa, OK 74133

Phone: 918-296-9889

tulsa_jazz_logo_new-01

The Myron and Booker Variety Show at The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

Myron and Booker

In vocalist Booker Gillespie, Myron Oliver has found a kindred spirit – especially when it comes to the local music scene. Like saxophonist Oliver, Gillespie not only performs a lot in and around Tulsa; he also appreciates the amount of talent he sees and hears when he’s a member of the audience.

           “So Booker and I decided to book a variety show,” says Oliver. “Whatever we do, we’re big supporters of local talent, no matter what genre or what style it is. This is a chance for us to play with the guys – some of the guys, at least – we like, and get to share some of that local talent on the Jazz Hall stage.”

Oliver has been down this path before, most recently in October of 2012, when he brought a similar variety of talent to the Jazz Depot in a well-received event billed as the Myron Oliver Friday Night Showcase.

“And for the most part,” he notes, “we’ve got different people than I had on that one. There’s so much talent in Tulsa. You can go out every night and hear somebody different and be equally wowed by what you hear.”

Oliver and Gillespie have both been wowing Tulsa crowds themselves, both together and separately, for the past several years. In addition to performing jazz-oriented shows together, Gillespie sings with Oliver’s busy cover band, FuZed.

fuzed cover

“We wanted to do something a little bit different from what we do when we’re playing in front of the party dance crowd on the late-night thing,” explains Oliver, “so we put together a band of musicians that aren’t the ones we normally play with – some of our musical cohorts. We’ve got Adrion Robbins, who’s played keyboards with Charlie Redd and Starr Fisher and a bunch of different people. Randy Cook is playing drums. I’m in another band, called Echo, with him. Travis Fite is playing guitar, and David Mooney’s on bass.

“We’ve got a variety of different music and some guest singers. Of course, the ladies from FuZed [Tina Phillips and Oliver’s wife, Tylisha Oliver] are going to sing a few songs and do some background vocals. We’ve got some Stevie Ray Vaughan in the set from Dylan Whitney, a young guitar player who’s one of my favorites. I think he’s 17 years old now, but I’ve known him since he was about 13. He’s been a professional for years. He’s just amazing.”

Another youngster on the bill is vocalist Alexsa Oliver, Myron and Tylisha’s fourteen-year-old daughter.  Other featured performers include saxophonist Paul Chatman and singer Benjamin Smith.

“I met Paul at the Jazz Hall, at one of the Tuesday Night Jams, probably six months ago or so, and we hit it off well. Since then, he’s been my go-to guy on saxophone, whenever I’m needing another horn to fill out a full band song, or to fill in on a gig that someone’s contacted me about. I want to get him some gigs out there and give him some exposure.

“Benjamin Smith is like the king of karaoke, and I say that in the best way. I met him a year and a half or two years ago, and I’ve been trying to get him up on stage with a band. The guy can sing. He puts you in mind of Luther Vandross or Teddy Pendergrass, and I had to get him in on this.”

myron and booker live

Then, of course, there’ll be the contributions of Gillespie and Oliver.

“Booker’s going to unveil an original song, a blues tune, and we’ve got a few other blues tunes on there,” says Oliver. “We’ve got a couple of standards, a little neo-soul, some R&B and jazz-funk. I’ve got some songs that are just going to be saxophone, with no vocals, so we’ll spread things out pretty well.

“Booker and I like a lot of the same kinds of music, and while we know that people will always try to put you in a box, we’re so far outside of any box people would want to put us in,” he adds with a laugh. “We’re diverse in the types of music we like and can perform well. Booker’s got an original country song – he loves country music. And my band, FuZed, covers everything. If they request country, we play country. If they request pop and rock, we can do that. Having that common life in music makes it fun for us.”

And, he notes, it’s also fun to present a variety of music to the audiences at the Jazz Depot.

 

“For us to be able to get somebody who’s known for rock or for R&B to be on that stage playing jazz, blues, funk, soul, whatever, just sheds light on how diverse the Jazz Hall really is and how much it supports music in general. It’s called the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, but people don’t know that any artistry is accepted and welcome there.”
The Myron and Booker Variety Show is set to begin at 5:00 p.m. Sunday, March 1, at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Depot, 111 E. First Street. Tickets can be purchased at the Depot, from www.jazzhalltickets.com, or by calling 918-928-JAZZ. General admission is $15, reserved table seating $20. Seniors and Jazz Hall members are admitted for $10, and high school and junior high students for $5.  Refreshments will be available for purchase.

The show is the first in the Jazz Hall’s 2015 Spring Concert Series.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fameis a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomans through the preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

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“Midnight Social Club” Farewell Performance at The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

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Midnight Social Club Brings Musical Farewell to Jazz Depot Friday

The SummerStage theater festival, that Tulsa audiences first met the four fictional ladies who provided the entertainment at a not-quite-first class 1930s bistro called the Midnight Social Club. Played by top Tulsa vocalists Cindy Cain (as club owner Violett Redd), Rebecca Ungerman (Garnett McGee), Pam Van Dyke Crosby (Stella Moon), and Annie Ellicott (Little Ruby) in a production calledBackstage at the Midnight Social Club, the characters proved to be so popular that they appeared in a second production, Onstage at the Midnight Social Club, and have performed occasionally in various configurations at Tulsa venues ever since.

Now, however, the Midnight Social Club appears to be shutting its doors for good. As Crosby notes, “Violett’s selling the club, Garnett’s going back on the road, Little Ruby’s moving to the big city, and Stella’s marrying her longtime boyfriend, Doghouse Bill.”

It is, at least partially, a case of art imitating life. Stella’s betrothed, who’s also the bassist in the Midnight Social Club band, is in real life Bill Crosby, Pam’s husband. And Ellicott really is moving away from Tulsa, something that comes as a blow to area jazz fans.

“Annie’s moving to San Francisco,” says Pam. “And even though she may be coming back from time to time, we probably won’t get a chance to do this again. So this will be the last time to see the four of us together doing the material from both of those shows, Backstage and Onstage.

Hence the name of Friday’s production, The Midnight Social Club – Last Chance. Pam stresses, however, that the Jazz Depot production is less a play than a show and dance.

“We’re going to act like our characters, but we’re just going to have a few lines,” she explains. “It’s going to be a show, but it’s also for dancing. We’ll be doing swing and Latin andfoxtrots. Since the club setting is in the 1930s, the songs we’re doing are from that era, except that there are a couple of originals.”

Chances are good that one of those originals will be the Cain-penned number that brought all the ladies of the Midnight Social Club together in the first place.

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“P. Casey Morgan wrote the original script for The Midnight Social Club,” she says, “Cindy Cain had wanted all of us to work together, and she wrote an opening song and had the idea for us all to be in a club. Then, we all kind of wrote our own characters and came up with the names and the name of the club.

“Violett Redd was the owner of the club, and when she took it over, she called my character, Stella Moon. I was a singer doing things in another town. Then, a friend of hers just kind of showed up one day and asked for a job. That was Garnett, played by Rebecca. So the three of us were singing together in the Midnight Social Club – which was, well, a little less than an A-1 nightclub.”

She laughs.

Then, unexpectedly, Little Ruby showed up. Violett Redd was her aunt, and she’d run away from home because her parents wanted her to marry a local pig farmer. She came to town and sang `Real Cowboy Girl’ and then got changed and became more sophisticated.”

In addition to the four vocalists playing those parts, all of the musicians involved in Friday’s production of The Midnight Social Club – Last Chance were on board for the first show back in 2008. They include Jeff Newsome on piano, Wade Robertson on drums, and “Doghouse Bill” Crosby on bass.

Those players also appeared on the original-cast CD, Backstage at the Midnight Social Club,which will be available for purchase at Friday’s show.

 The Midnight Social Club – Last Chancepresented by Sweet and Hot Productions, is set to begin at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 4, at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’sJazz Depot, 111 E. First Street. The show is presented in conjunction with the Brady Arts District’s First Friday Art Crawl. Admission is $10 at the door, with advance tickets available from Bettie Downing at 918-281-8609.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

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Angie Cockrell Performs at The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

 

Angie Cockrell 2012

Award-Winning Vocalist Angie Cockrell

Headlines December 8 Jazz Depot Show

Although she’s been a shining star on the Jazz Depot’s roster of performers for several years now, singer Angie Cockrell is just as well known in gospel and contemporary-Christian music circles. In fact, Urban Tulsa Weekly recently named her Christian Artist of the Year.

And because she began her career singing in churches and related venues, she’s never suffered from the anxiety that a listening room like the Jazz Depot can bring to acts who’ve come up through the club scene and are therefore not used to having an audience’s rapt attention throughout an entire set.

“A lot of my beginnings were in a performance-style situation, mainly in churches, where all eyes were on me,” she says. “So this type of setting is not uncomfortable for me. Also, through my years of being involved with the Jazz Hall, not only singing but volunteering – I try to volunteer there quite often – I’ve gotten to know the people. I just kind of feel like it’s home, and that makes it easy.”

It was her friendship and connection with the powerhouse singer andOklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame Inductee Ernestine Dillard, also known for her work in gospel and contemporary Christian music, which got Cockrell her entrée to the Jazz Depot stage.

ernestine-dillard“Ernestine and I have known one another for years, and we’ve done many shows together,” she explains. “She invited me to sing there at a show she was doing, and I came in and sang `At Last.'”

Since then, Cockrell has not only appeared in a number of large-cast concerts at the Depot; she’s also headlined her own. Along the way, she’s become known for her versions of several standards, including the abovementioned “At Last,” a major hit for blues singer Etta James in the early ’60s.

“That’s a staple song for me; I do it almost everywhere I go,” says Cockrell. “People know me for that song, and for `Summertime,’ and Patsy Cline’s `Crazy.’ Those are some of my staple songs, so of course I’ll be doing those in the show.”

“Angie’s a great performer,” said Jason McIntosh, Oklahoma Jazz Hall of FameCEO. “Like so many of us, Angie’s first experience with music was through her church, and that musical background allows her to connect with a crowd.”

She’s dubbed her upcoming concert Angie Cockrell Sings to YouIn it, she’ll be accompanied by Jeff Shadley on piano, Myron Oliver on saxophone, Jordan Hehl on bass, and John Dellavedova on drums.

The show, she says, will present some numbers that are frequently requested during her appearances, both at the Jazz Depot and elsewhere.

“I tried to choose songs that were my favorites and other people’s favorites,” she notes. “At the Jazz Hall, I’ve had one man come up to mes_017 every time I’ve sung `What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life’ and tell me that it was a favorite for him and his wife. And his wife is now deceased. That song has been a favorite of mine since I was a teenager, so to get to do it there [at the Jazz Depot], and to have someone to come up and tell me that, it just means so much to me. So I’m looking forward to doing that song.”

For her Sunday playlist, she adds, “I’m mixing things up a little bit. I’m not only going to be doing jazz. I’m also going to be adding in a little country, a little soft rock, a little blues, a little gospel. Even a little Christmas.”

All of it, however, no matter what the genre, will have one thing in common.

“I sing from the heart,” she says. “When I sing gospel music, Christian music, that’s just my heart coming out. And when I sing jazz, it’s kind of the same way. I sing a lot of ballads, and jazz is so rich with history and the stories that it tells. So when I sing jazz, I get that same feeling, and I’m just enriched by that.’

Angie Cockrell Sings to You is set to begin at 5:00p.m. Sunday, December 8, at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Depot, 111 E. First Street. Tickets can be purchased at the depot, from www.myticketoffice.com, or by calling Bettie Downing at 918-281-8609. General admission is $15, reserved table seating $20. Seniors and Jazz Hall members are admitted for $10, and high school and junior high students for $5.

The show is a part of the Jazz Hall’s 2013-14 Winter Concert Series.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and

            

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fameis a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomans through preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

jazz hall at night

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National Artist Spotlite: Marianne Solivan Jazz Vocalist

Marianne Solivan

Quickly becoming one of the most buzzed about jazz singers on the New York scene, Marianne Solivan does not remember an “ah-ha” moment that brought her to the music she has devoted herself to: “I don’t recall having a big moment that made me like jazz. I just dug it.”

It is that same simplicity of statement with its intrinsic honesty that characterizes Solivan’s style. The infallible swing of Ella, the daring of Betty Carter, the matter-of factness of Carmen McCrae…They can all be found in the voice of Marianne Solivan, whom trumpeter Jeremy Pelt has called “the modern-day paradigm to which all singers should aspire.”

Click here to listen to Marianne in a conversation on Coffee Talk Jazz Radio with host Ms. Bridgette Lewis

For more information click the links below:

Marianne Solivan:

Website: http://www.mariannesolivanjazz.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarianneSolivan

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarianneSolivan

Coffee Talk Jazz Radio

Twitter:@CoffeeTalkJazz

Website: CoffeeTalkJazzRadio.com

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/thecoffeelady/

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