Dean Demerritt and Frank Brown with Cindy Cain at Juniper Monday February 8th, 2016

Cindy Cain Juniper Feb 8

Join Dean and Frank as they welcome special guest vocalist Cindy Cain tonight!

Located at 3rd & Elgin in downtown Tulsa, Juniper focuses on providing the freshest, local products prepared simply and beautifully. Using hand-selected items sourced from Green Country, Juniper’s menu evolves with the changing seasons, allowing Justin and his team to introduce new and exciting plates with French influences. The bar at Juniper focuses on innovation in mixology, utilizing infused vodkas, gins and flavored bitters. Experience Juniper with us for a gourmet lunch, handmade cocktails or a delicious dinner with friends and family.juniper logo

The Jazz will be just as delicious as Dean, Frank, and Cindy serve up your favorite standards and toe-tapping tunes all while Juniper’s incredible staff provides you with the excellent service they are known for.

Come experience Juniper with us this Monday night for handmade cocktails, a delicious dinner, and some wonderful music with friends and family, you’ll be glad you did 🙂

Additional Show Information:

Dates/Times:  

Monday  February  8th, 2015  6 30 pm-8 30 pm

Location: Juniper Restaurant 3rd and Elgin Tulsa , Oklahoma

Phone: 918-794-1090

Juniper’s Website: junipertulsa.com

Juniper on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/junipertulsa

Dean Demerritt’s Website: www.deandemerritt.com

Frank Brown’s Website: www.frankbrowntrio.com

Like Tulsa Jazz on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TulsaJazz1

Follow Tulsa Jazz on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TulsaJazz1

Follow Tulsa Jazz on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tulsajazz

Follow Tulsa Jazz on Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/tulsajazz

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“Bill and Pam Crosby’s Excellent Adventure” A Musical Celebration Of Their 33 Wedding Anniversary at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

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BILL & PAM’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE CELEBRATES 33 YEARS OF JAZZY TOGETHERNESS

In addition to all the live music from some of the areas top jazz performers, there’ll be something else of interest on display at the Jazz Depot Sunday: A blowup of a photo from September 5, 1982, taken by renowned Tulsa photographer Gaylord Herron.

“He’s my brother-in-law, and he took that picture with one of those cameras that had an 8″X10″ negative,” explains Bill Crosby. “So it’s a great big photo of our wedding, showing all the people who were there, out in our backyard.”

Central to the shot are Crosby and his then-new bride, Pam Van Dyke, who celebrate 33 years as a married couple at Sunday’s show. And while their personal lives had only intersected a year or so before Herron snapped that photo, bassist Crosby and vocalist Van Dyke had both been professionals on the Tulsa music scene for decades by then.

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“We’d known each other a long time before we ever got together,” Crosby says. “I remember years ago, when I was working at the Hilton with [pianist] Bob Clear, she was working down the street with a group called the Sound of Four. When we’d finish, we’d go over and listen to ’em. More than likely, she sat in a few times with us, too.”

Later, he adds, “I was [bandleader and keyboardist] Sammy Pagna’s bassist; I’d worked with him off and on ever since I was a kid, almost, going back to the ’60s. In 1981, he was doing a benefit of some kind at the Old Lady on Brady and he wanted a singer. Kenny Mills was his guitar player, and he and Pam had been working together a lot. So Kenny said, `Why don’t you get Pam to sing?’ At that time, Sammy was doing dances every Wednesday night at the Caravan [Ballroom], and they invited her over to the next one and she sat in. That’s when Pam and I got started.”

The song Pam ended up singing with Pagna’s band at the benefit was Stevie Wonder’s “My Cherie Amour.” Thirty-four years later, it’s also going to be one of the numbers she performs at their wedding-anniversary concert on Sunday.

“We’ve gone through our list and found some of the old songs we started out with,” her husband says. “We’ve got so many that we won’t have time to do them all, but besides `My Cherie Amour,’ we’ll do stuff like `Without A Song,’ `Caravan,’ `[Take the] “A” Train,’ `On A Clear Day,’ and ‘This Masquerade,’ which is the best song Leon Russell ever wrote.”

Crosby actually played some jobs during the late 1950s with Russell and drummer Chuck Blackwell. Russell was a student at Will Rogers High School then, still using his given name of Russell Bridges. The three had met earlier at a legendary Tulsa jazz club.

“When I was working at the Rubiyat, Leon was in high school, and he and Blackwell would come out and sit in. He was a jazzer. He didn’t play rock ‘n’ roll back then. But he got smart,” notes Crosby with a laugh.

Among the guests scheduled to take the Jazz Depot stage Sunday are Sonny Gray, the well-known Tulsa pianist who owned the Rubiyat. He joins an impressive lineup that includes fellow keyboardists Tim Shadley, Charles Gardner, and Jack Wolfe.

Other well-known performers on the bill include drummers Anthony Yohe, Wade Robertson, and Ron McCrory; trumpeters Mike Bennett and Mike Moore; vocalists Sandy Gardner and Cindy Cain; saxophonist Victor Anderson; and bassists Jim Bates and Dean DeMerritt, along with Crosby himself. In addition to being the top jazz names in town, “these are just people we play with these days,” notes Crosby.

Many of them, however, go back with one or both of the Crosbys a long time. And in at least one case, the connection is intergenerational.

“Dean DeMerritt’s mom and dad were both at our wedding,” Crosby points out. “His name was Dean DeMerritt too, a jazz piano player. Tony[Yohe] and I worked with him a bunch, back in the day.”

 

Bill & Pam’s Excellent Adventure is set to begin at 5 p.m. Sunday, September 6, at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Depot, 111 E. First Street. Tickets can be purchased at the Depot, from www.jazzhalltickets.com, or by calling 918-928-JAZZ. General admission is $15, reserved table seating $20. Seniors and Jazz Hall members are admitted for $10, and high school and junior high students for $5.

The show is a part of the Jazz Hall’s 2015 Autumn Concert Series.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomans through preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

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International Jazz Day…A Look Back

FB_IMG_1430327710588Another International Jazz Day has come and gone but it’s impact will go on and on…

As I laid in bed last night, just after midnight, I realized how historic, fun, and impactful the day had been. As a jazz fan and professional in the music business you experience some special moments, an epic show, the big recording deal, landing a big name client, but few events rival 185 countries setting aside differences, joining forces and celebrating together like the events of yesterday! Jazz did that, that’s right JAZZ!

Note: There was an event held in all 50 states in the US!

700+ events around the world, plus an incredible concert in Paris of some of Jazz’s finest, took people away from their problems, issues, and conflicts for a moment and transported them to a place of peace, joy, and musical bliss…happy,happy, happy 🙂

Only music has the ability to do this, it overcomes cultural and language barriers, socioeconomic differences and allow people to come together in harmony like nothing else and jazz is leading the way.

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We have put together a slide show of some of the event posters and people involved in the events of yesterday as well as a link to watch the incredible concert that took place in Paris.

As you go about your day, remember when you have those moments of “I need to get away”  grab your CD, Laptop/tablet, or smartphone and let music, especially Jazz, transport you to a faraway land, be your time machine and take you back to a special moment, let it soothe, move,and refresh you. Let it rekindle and invigorate your passion, and most of all most of all let it encourage you to share your love for music, jazz in particular, with others.

To borrow a saying from someone very special to me…Stay Jazzy!

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame Presents “Tin Pan Alley Magic” Sunday April 19th

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Pam Crosby and an All-Star cast take you on a musical journey this Sunday at 5 pm!

Produced by Pam Van Dyke Crosby, the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame presents Tin Pan Alley Magic. Featuring Darell Christopher, Cindy Cain, Larry Cochran, Joe Wilkinson, Sandy Sterling, Angie Cockrell, Cynthia Simmons, Barry Hensley, and Pam Van Dyke Crosby. The performance will also include Scott McQuade on keys, Bill Crosby on bass, Wade Robertson on drums, Tim Shadley on trombone, and Tom Sterling on sax.

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To enjoy the jazz, call at (918) 928-JAZZ or visit www.JazzHallTickets.com. Members and Seniors enjoy discounted ticket prices at $10.00 each.  General Admission tickets are only $15.00, or $20.00 for Reserved Table Seating. High school and middle school students admitted for only $5.00.

The event is a part of the Jazz Hall’s 2015 Spring Concert Series.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomans through the preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

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TulsaJazz.Com Presents Cindy Cain Performing at Main St. Tavern

 

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Sassy, Sultry, Sexy, are all adjectives used to describe Cindy Cain. This incredible Jazz and Blues singer is bringing all of that and more when she makes her debut performance at Main St. Tavern in Broken Arrow’s Rose District this Wednesday.

She will be accompanied by the one and only Scott McQuade one of the most gifted and talented keyboardist in the area. This dynamic duo will delight your ears with many of your favorite jazz standards and sass it up with some down home blues tunes…this is a must see event!

Bring your friends, neighbors, relatives and enemies (they get to sit in the back) and enjoy some fantastic food, pallet pleasing wines, and wonderful music, show goes from 6-9 pm, reservations are not required.

This is a TulsaJazz.Com Production

Date/Time: Wednesday, October 22, 2014  6-9 pm

Location: Main St. Tavern

200 S Main St, Broken Arrow, OK 74012

Phone(918) 872-1414

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MainStreetTavernBA

“Too Darn Hot” Cole Porter Revue at The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame October 5th, 2014

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“Too Darn Hot” Cole Porter Revue Features All-Female Vocalists

            Although there are a lot of factors that go into making a show a hit, it’s hard to go wrong with a concert full of Cole Porter music. In his four-plus decades as a songwriter and composer, the Indiana native contributed scores of classic tunes to the Great American Songbook, including such evergreens as “Night and Day,” “I Get A Kick out of You,” “My Heart Belongs to Daddy,” and “Let’s Do It, Let’s Fall in Love.”

Porter’s drawing power has always been celebrated by the Oklahoma Jazz Hallof Fame, since a Cole Porter show was included in the Jazz Hall‘s initial slate of concerts. That first show was a success, and Jazz Hall-produced Porter concerts quickly became highly anticipated events. Today, CEO Jason McIntosh carries on the tradition, as does Tulsa’s First Lady of Jazz, vocalist Pam Van Dyke Crosby.

“I was on the first Cole Porter show produced,” she says, “and that was back when the Jazz Hall was at the Greenwood Cultural Center. We’ve had one just about every year since.”

Crosby’s producing the latest one, dubbed Too Darn Hot: A Cole Porter Review. And “just to have something a little bit different,” she’s decided to go with all female vocalists. To that end, she’s enlisted some of Tulsa’s finest jazz singers; scheduled to perform Sunday are Sandy Gardner, Cynthia Simmons, Olivia Duhon, Cindy Cain,Angie Cockrell, Louiza Cornelius, Stephanie Oliver, and Ashlee Elmore, as well as Pam herself. The only name on that list that might not be familiar to Jazz Depot audiences is Elmore, who recently moved to town and became the director of the Tulsa Children’s Chorus.

“She’s a young woman, a good singer,” says Crosby.”She just did a show with Olivia [Duhon] at the Jazz Hall, and I heard her sing [Porter’s] `I’ve Got You under My Skin.’ I’ve heard her sing a couple of times before, and I thought she’d be good for this.”

Once she assembled her cast for the Porter show, Crosby gave each vocalist the option of either choosing from a group of arrangements done by Oklahoma JazzHall of Famer Chuck Gardner or picking other Porter songs they liked. This freedom of choice, she says, led to   “some unusual tunes” set for Sunday, including a couple selected by Cindy Cain. Those are “High Society Calypso,” from the 1956 movie High Society, and “Find Me A Primitive Man,” which debuted in the 1929 Broadway musical Fifty Million Frenchmen but is probably better known by today’s audiences because of its memorable performance by Madeline Kahn in the 1975 film At Long Last Love.

“Cole Porter’s songs have everything,” notes Crosby. “The lyrics are very intelligent and sometimes funny, the melodies are interesting and sometimes challenging – like in `Begin the Beguine.’ And they lend themselves to all kinds of different rhythms. You can take a Cole Porter tune and make it a swing tune, or a nice Latin tune. You can do them as ballads. They’re just timeless. I love his songs.”cole porter Songbook

In addition to each vocalist doing the songs she’s picked, there’ll be at least one duet and one trio performance over the course of the evening. And, while the singers will all be women, the band is all-male, a trio of top-notch players enjoyed often by Jazz Depot patrons: pianist Scott McQuade, bassist Bill Crosby, and drummer Tony Yohe.

“They’ve played the Cole Porter shows, too, but it’s not a reprise, because some of the guy songs we’ve done in the past will be sung by gals,” explains Pam. “`I’ve Got You Under My Skin,’ for instance, is usually done by a guy, but we’re going to have it in our show. I just think it’s all going to be really fun and interesting.”

Too Darn Hot: A Cole Porter Revueis set to begin at 5:00 p.m. Sunday, October 5th, at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Depot, 111 E. First Street. Tickets can be purchased at the Depot, fromwww.myticketoffice.com, or by calling Bettie Downing at 918-281-8609. General admission is $15, reserved table seating $20. Seniors and Jazz Hall members are admitted for $10, and high school and junior high students for $5.

The show is a part of the Jazz Hall‘s 2014 Autumn Concert Series.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fameis a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomans through the preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

Dean Demerritt Performs at The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

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 DEAN DEMERRITT PUTS ON HIS BASS FACE FOR SUNDAY’S JAZZ DEPOT SHOW

 

First of all, here’s the reason for the unusual name of the Sunday concert featuring veteran bassist Dean DeMerritt and his group of equally top-notch jazz players:

“I’m calling it Bass Face, because I met a great bass player out of Detroit, Ray McMurtry, in Atlanta one time, and he asked me to sit in,” explains DeMerritt. “I was kind of nervous, because he was a great musician. So after I got done playing with him, I asked him what he thought about my playing. And what he said to me was, `I’ve finally met someone who makes uglier faces than I dowhenI play.’” He laughs. “So, you know what? I’ll take that.”

Until about a month ago, DeMerritt was living and performing in the city where he metMcMurtry, having moved to Atlanta in 1996. If you’re a jazz fan, however, you can hardly miss noticing DeMerritt’s recent impact on the Tulsa scene, where he seems to be featured on some stage or other just about every night.

“It’s been great so far,” he says. “I’ve been really fortunate to hook up with some great musicians here in Tulsa. I’ve been playing with Mike Cameron, Scott McQuade, Frank Brown, and, gosh, Cindy Cain and Tim Shadley, just to mention a few.”

DeMerritt’s move to Tulsa is of the circle-closing variety.  The son of a Tulsa jazz pianist and graduate of the University of Tulsa’s music program, DeMerritt had barely finished taking his finals when he was invited to go on the road with the Texas-based, hard-touring western-swing andboogie-woogie outfit, Asleep at the Wheel. That was in 1979, and during his years in the group he would be joined by several other Tulsa musicians, including piano player Falkner Evans, saxophonist Pat “Taco” Ryan, and drummer Billy Estes.asleep at the wheel

“I played with Asleep at the Wheel four years or so, and then I came back to Tulsa briefly and played in a few bands,” DeMerritt recalls. “Then I moved to the Dallas-Fort Worth area and played gigs down there. I played with the Fort Worth Symphony for a little while.

“That was 30 years ago, so it’s been 30 years since I lived in Tulsa full-time. I have family here, so I’ve come back and hung out and played, but I haven’t actually lived here since 1984.”

The reason for his return to Tulsa, he adds, has to do with both aesthetics and finances.

“I’ve finally reached a point in my life where I have so few debts, my overhead is so low, that I can finally afford to be a jazz musician full time – and Tulsa’s inexpensive to live in. Extremely inexpensive. Food and shelter and fuel costs are very, very little. So finally, I don’t have to have a dreaded day job. I can play music, write music, breathe music all the time.”

It’s a good thing, too, because he’s getting the opportunity to do just that.

“I’ve lived in Tulsa a month now, and I’ve had more informal people, calling me at midnight and wanting to come over for a jam session, than I had in years in Atlanta,” DeMerritt says. “The scene in smaller and people can get to my house in 15 minutes rather than being an hour away in another part of town.

“The venues are really good in Tulsa, considering the size of the city, but the camaraderie, the people who are willing to come over and bring an instrument or sing until the sun comes up – that’s really nice.”20140710_224436

”It’s great to have him back in town,” says Jason McIntosh, Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame CEO. “We’re looking forward not just to Dean’s shows, but to the impact he has on music education, and our next generation of Jazz Hall inductees.”

For Bass Face, DeMerritt will be joined by saxophonist Cameron and guitarist Brown, along with Jeff Newsome on piano and Michael Bremo on drums. Together, he says, “We’ll do one original and some little-known jazz nuggets. Because these Tulsa musicians can play so many different kinds of things, we’ll do everything from gypsy jazz to Snarky Puppy, and we’ll do some stuff by Oklahoma composers like Sam Rivers, a great sax player, and Oscar Pettiford. We’re doing “The Plain But Simple Truth,” an Oscar Pettiford song he did with Lucky Thompson. We’ve also arranged a Beatles tune for jazz improvisation. So it’s going to be very eclectic.”

Dean DeMerritt’s Bass Face concert is set to begin at 5:00 p.m. Sunday, August 17, at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Depot, 111 E. First Street.

Tickets can be purchased at the Depot, from www.myticketoffice.com, or by calling BettieDowning at 918-281-8609. General admission is $15, reserved table seating $20. Seniors and Jazz Hall members are admitted for $10, and high school and junior high students for $5.  Refreshments will be available for purchase.

The show is a part of the Jazz Hall’s 2014 Summer Concert Series.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomansthrough the preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

jazz hall at night