2nd Annual Chet Baker Jazz Festival Saturday October 1st Yale, Oklahoma

 

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The City of Yale honors one of their own, the late, great Chet Baker

Chesney Henry “Chet” Baker Jr. was born on December 23, 1929, in Yale, Oklahoma, and moved to the Los Angeles area with his family at age 10. The son of musically inclined parents, he sang in church choirs and tried his hand at trombone before turning to trumpet at age 13.

Baker dropped out of school at 16 to join the Army, and played in bands during his two stints in the armed forces. In between, he was turned on to the music of Miles Davis and became involved in the Los Angeles jazz scene.

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Baker’s musical career took off after he earned the chance to play with jazz great Charlie Parker in 1952. That year he joined saxophonist Gerry Mulligan’s piano-less quartet, and the pairing of Baker’s subdued tone and gentle phrasing with Mulligan’s ear for harmonies proved a dynamic combination. The quartet reeled off such favorites as “Walkin’ Shoes,” “Bernie’s Tune” and “My Funny Valentine,” which became one of Baker’s signature songs.

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The festival will consist of various artist from Tulsa and around the state, to a person, if asked, they will state how honored they are to be a part of such an historic event.

Bruce Guthrie Exec. Dir of the Chet Baker Foundation stated that “He hopes this will continue be one of many annual celebrations of Chet’s legacy here in his hometown of Yale, Oklahoma.”

The line up for this great event is as follows:

Hank Williams Tribute –  4:00 to 5:00 p.m.

 

Steve Wilkerson and Andrea Baker Duo – 5:00 to 7:00 p.m.

 

Moore Jazz w/ guest vocalist Cynthia Simmons – 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Additional Information:

The Chet Baker Festival will run from 4-9 p.m. on Main and Boston in downtown Yale, about 45 minutes west of Tulsa. The festival is free and open to the public.

The festival is sponsored in part by the City of Yale, the Yale Chamber of Commerce, the Chet Baker Estate LLC and the Chet Baker Foundation.

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Inaugural Chet Baker Jazz Festival Saturday October 10th Yale, Oklahoma

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Trumpeter Mike Moore leads an All-Star cast honoring the Late, Great Chet Baker

Chesney Henry “Chet” Baker Jr. was born on December 23, 1929, in Yale, Oklahoma, and moved to the Los Angeles area with his family at age 10. The son of musically inclined parents, he sang in church choirs and tried his hand at trombone before turning to trumpet at age 13.

Baker dropped out of school at 16 to join the Army, and played in bands during his two stints in the armed forces. In between, he was turned on to the music of Miles Davis and became involved in the Los Angeles jazz scene.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Baker’s musical career took off after he earned the chance to play with jazz great Charlie Parker in 1952. That year he joined saxophonist Gerry Mulligan’s pianoless quartet, and the pairing of Baker’s subdued tone and gentle phrasing with Mulligan’s ear for harmonies proved a dynamic combination. The quartet reeled off such favorites as “Walkin’ Shoes,” “Bernie’s Tune” and “My Funny Valentine,” which became one of Baker’s signature songs.

The festival will consist of various artist from around the state and some from as far away as California, to a person, if asked, will state how honored they are to be a part of such an historic event.

Bruce Guthrie Exec. Dir of the Chet Baker Foundation stated that “He hopes this will be the first many annual celebrations of Chet’s legacy here in his hometown of Yale, Oklahoma.”

The line up for this great event is as follows: (Note:  Some of these artists played with Chet Baker during his career)

Jazz Standard with Mike Leland, Bill Crosby, Mike Moore and Rick Cope –  4:00 to 5:30 p.m.

 

Dean DeMerritt Jazz Tribe feat. Sarah Maud5:30 to 7:00 p.m.

 

Stephanie Oliver and Pat Kelley7:00 to 8:30 p.m.

 

Jam Session8:30 to 10:00 p.m.

Additional Information:

The Chet Baker Festival will run from 4-10 p.m. on Main and Boston in downtown Yale, about 45 minutes west of Tulsa. The festival is free and open to the public.

The festival is sponsored in part by the City of Yale, the Yale Chamber of Commerce, the Chet Baker Estate LLC and the Chet Baker Foundation.

Like Tulsa Jazz on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TulsaJazz1

Follow Tulsa Jazz on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TulsaJazz1

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“Jazz Up”: An Online Art Gallery

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Jazz Up! An Online Art Gallery

We love jazz and we love art, what if you put the two of them together? You would have our Jazz Up!: Online Art Gallery board on Pinterest!

What you will find there are quite a few of our favorite jazz art paintings posted in this fantastic online gallery for your enjoyment.

Music and art have always complemented each other and we have thoroughly  enjoyed putting together this collection for you, please stop by an peruse through these wonderful paintings done by some incredible artists. We hope you enjoy viewing this collection as much as we have enjoyed putting it together.

While you’re there, check out some of our other boards as well such as: Tulsa’s Jazz, Jazz Clubs, Jazz History, Women and Jazz: A Celebration in Art, and many more!

Check back with us regularly to keep up with our latest posts about jazz history and jazz art and Tulsa’s jazz community…thanks again for your support.

 

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Cow Bop: The Best in Cowboy Jazz at The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

Cow Bop’s Route 66 Tour Hits Jazz Depot Tuesday 

             Those who catch Cow Bop’s show Tuesday, July 23, at the Jazz Depot may be in on the ground floor of something revolutionary.

The concert, according to Cow Bop guitarist and founder Bruce Forman, is part of what he terms “a linear music festival.”

“The traditional musical festival is like Woodstock, Coachella, the Monterey Jazz Festival, where people go to a specific place to listen to music, and bands show up,” he explains. “That idea has expanded to where whole towns, like Austin with South by Southwest and Port Townsend [Washington] become festivals. What I’m trying to do is create a linear festival down Route 66 for ten or eleven days, with all these bands playing, with their own itineraries and their own schedules, and then through social media, via Twitter and Facebook and YouTube, just put the story out on the Web.

“I’m just trying to create something new and celebrate the spirit of Route 66,” he adds. “I’m a teacher in residence at USC, so what I’ve done is make it into a collaborative learning experience, where all these bands – student bands, alumni bands, and faculty bands – are along on this trip. We have over a dozen bands out on the road, playing along Route 66, which is a linear community. We’re celebrating the road and teaching the culture of the road and how deeply imbedded it is in the music we play. We’re also adding youthful energy and helping out the economy of the road. It’s a very holistic attempt at something, and we’re sharing our information on a Website that has Facebook and Instagram and Twitter. It’s called lickson66.com.”

For the Tulsa show, Forman hopes to have a guest from his linear-festival tour sitting in with the Cow Bop lineup, which also includes vocalist Pinto Pammy, horn player David Wise, bassist Alex Frank, and drummer Jake Reed.

“I’m hoping an exceptional student of mine from USC, a fiddle player, will be in town at the same time and play a tune with us,’ he says.

Meanwhile, he’d also like to see Tulsa fiddler Shelby Eicher, who’s recorded and performed with Cow Bop, sit in as well. Eicher and his cohorts – including two of his sons — in the acoustic-jazz outfit Mischievous Swing are set to open the show.MischievousSwingWeb1

“That band is really fantastic,” notes Forman. “Anything Shelby does is amazing.”

The West Coast-based Cow Bop was last in town in the fall, where they shared the Cain’s Ballroom stage with the Tulsa Playboys (a swing band that includes Eicher) in

an award-winning live broadcast of Public Radio Tulsa’s Swing on This, honoring the anniversary of the birth of western-swing figure Johnnie Lee Wills. On that night, Forman played many of the bop-oriented licks that have given him a high standing in jazz circles.

“Forman’s music demonstrates that jazz and western swing are closely aligned,” explains Jason McIntosh, Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame CEO. “The fact that Charlie Parker and Milton Brown inhabit the same musical universe is not surprising to Cow Bop fans.”

“Western swing to me has always been jazz music,” Forman says. “When you go back to its inception, with Bob Wills and Milton Brown [in the late 1920s-early 1930s], those guys were playing swing beat, which is exactly what the jazz musicians of the day were playing. They were doing many of the same tunes. It was all based on playing the melody and letting everybody show off their dazzling musicianship while keeping a really great groove going to keep the dancers happy.”

The biggest difference at the time was that the western swing musicians did it predominantly with stringed instruments, while the jazz players utilized more brass and reeds. Also, adds Forman, “They had different backgrounds, which created a slightly different sound.

“I’ve always believed that the whole idea of jazz is to play your way and bring all your influences and aesthetics to the music and make something happen,” he says. “On that point, I don’t see any difference between western swing and jazz, and to me it’s always been just strange that western swing was not considered a part of jazz history and tradition.

“I’m doing my part,” he concludes with a chuckle, “to make sure that’s corrected.”

Mischievous Swing is set to open the show for Cow Bop at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, July 23, at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Depot, 111 E. First Street. Tickets can be purchased at the depot, fromwww.myticketoffice.com, or by calling Bettie Downing at 918-281-8609. General admission is $15.00, reserved table seating $20.00. Seniors and Jazz Hall members are admitted for $10.00, and high school and junior high students for $5.00.

Cow Bop: The Best in Cowboy Jazz is a part of the Jazz Hall’s Summer Concert Series.

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomans through preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

 

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2013 Young Artist Competition Recital at The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

Oklahoma-Israeli Exchange Announces Winner

Young Artist Jordan Hehl to be showcased this Sunday

Sunday, for the first time ever, the past three winners of the Oklahoma Israel Exchange’s Young Artists Competition will perform on the same stage.

 Also for the first time ever, the newest winner is a bass player.
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Tulsa jazz bassist Jordan Hehl recently won the 2013 competition, awarded in 2012 to Steven Schrag and in 2011 by Barron Ryan, who are both pianists. Of course, there are a lot fewer solo bassists than there are solo piano players, so when Hehl auditioned, he brought along a couple of his longtime musical cohorts: drummer Nicholas Foster and a pianist, who happened to be Schrag.

“I didn’t want it to be a solo audition, because I’m a bass player, and when you play bass, it’s all about how you play with a group,” Hehl explains. “A lot of the best bass playing is done under the other players; that’s the function of the instrument. It’s great to have a bass player who’s a good soloist, but you could have someone who never,

ever took a solo, and he could be the perfect bass player.”

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Jordan Hehl

With that in mind, Hehl chose to audition with some pieces he enjoyed performing with the trio, rather than anything to show himself off.

 “We opened up with `Billy’s Bounce,’ a Charlie Parker tune. I hadn’t had a chance to warm up because I was just coming in from work, and that’s the fastest song we did. So it was kind of intense and just for a second a little bit shaky, but we got it all together,” he remembers. “We did an original of mine, called `The Comedown,’ which I wrote for my senior project at TU, and then we did a tune by the Meters called `Stormy,’ a really mellow tune.

“They asked if we had anything else, and we picked a swing tune we all knew, `Bye, Bye Blackbird.’ That was one where I felt really comfortable and was able to step out a little bit.”

 “It’s funny,” he adds with a chuckle. “Afterwards, they [the judges] said, `That wasn’t a very showy piece.’ I said, `Oh. Well, that’s the one I like playing the most.’ I was thinking, `Gosh, that was great’ and they were saying, `Well, you probably shouldn’t have played that one.’

“I’d guessed that some of them were musicians, but I wasn’t thinking about it much,” he recalls. “Then afterwards, they told me who they were. I said, `Thank you for not telling me before I started playing,'” he says with another chuckle.

 The judges for the Oklahoma Israel Exchange (OKIE) competition included the principal bassist and other members of the Israel Symphony Orchestra, a fact Hehl didn’t know until after his turn on stage.

Sunday, Hehl will bring the same trio to the Jazz Depot stage for his portion of the show. The three, known collectively as the Ghost Quartet, play Tuesdays as house band for the Depot’s jam sessions, Wednesdays for the Depot’s Jazzwich lunch-hour shows, and Thursdays at the Vault in Tulsa.

“We play three- and four-hour gigs all the time, so we’ve got a bunch of material together,” he says. “So [Sunday] we’ll do some originals and original arrangements. A lot of what we do with the Ghost Quartet is take rock songs and put our own weird spin on them. We just did Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon [at the Jazz Depot]. We do songs by Radiohead, and the Beatles’ `Come Together.’

Steven Schrag
Steven Schrag

“What we’re trying to do,’ he adds, “is take the jazz format and make it accessible to kids our age. When they hear a saxophone and acoustic bass and piano and drums, their ears automatically shut off and they say, `Well, okay, that’s jazz, and that’s not what I listen to.’ But if we do a song they recognize, then we can kind of introduce the format to them that way. I mean, we love the old standards, but I think a lot of the time when we play them we feel like we’re just imitators. What we’re trying to do is connect jazz with a lot of the music we grew up listening to.”

The OKIE Competition winners are set to begin at 5p.m. Sunday, June 8, at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, located in downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Depot, 111 E. First St. Tickets can be purchased at the depot, from www.myticketoffice.com, or by calling Bettie Downing at 918-281-1008. General admission is $15, reserved table seating $20. Seniors and Jazz Hall members are admitted for $10, and high school and junior high students for $5.

The event is a part of the Jazz Hall’s Summer Concert Series.

Depot

The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) non-profit cultural and educational organization, with a mission to inspire creativity and improve the quality of life for all Oklahomans through preservation, education, and performance of jazz, our uniquely American art form.

 

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